Lund-Hoel House

The Most Famous House in Town!

Stone headers and entrance gate to the historic lund-hoel house.

49 Day House

History Summary

1891: The 49 day wonder of 1891 was brand new and somewhat large, but it was not the "palatial residence" with the decorative balconies, the turret, and the "gingerbread" trim that visitors to the Lund-Hoel House Museum admire today. Those appealing architectural enhancements were added to Lund's original house nine years later when whopping real estate sales by the Lund Land Agency made John G. famous throughout the state and a bona fide millionaire.


John G. Lund's "49 Day" House of 1891 (above) stayed as it was for only a short time before workmen, painters, and carpenters were again summoned to improve the residence.


1895: Although it was considered extravagant, and by many as foolish, a gas plant was installed in the basement of Lund's house, and so in 1895 the dwelling was lighted not by kerosene lamps but by gas. Four years after its construction, painters reapplied the familiar, dark green color of its original paint color.


1896: Carpenters added on the uncomfortably small, rear rooms known as servants quarters.  (There were never ‘servants’, but there were paid employees.  The rooms were called ‘servants’ quarters due to their small size.)


1900: "J. G. Lund is building quite extensively onto his residence this summer." So states the Canby News on 10 August 1900. Porches, balconies, decorative trim and a turret were added as well as many square feet of living space. The "landmark" fence of "hardheads" (field stones) appeared in the summer of 1900. "This stone is odd yet there is a charm about it which tends to make its surroundings home-like and unique." ~CanbyNews 


1901: During this summer Lund laid cement walks on two sides of his yards as well as through a portion of "Lund Park," half a village block or more of garden planted to the west of the house.


1903: "Last week J. G. Lund sold his beautiful green Canby residence to Rev Olaf Hoel of the Norwegian Lutheran Church." (Canby News) Mr. Lund's daughter is the Reverend's wife, with the home passing to their daughter Nella in 1931. The house stays in the original family until 1958.


Although John Lund, his wife, & his dogs are on both pictures, the windmill is different, and may indicate 2 different time frames. Mrs Lund looks down from the balcony on the right picture. Larger “servant’s” quarters (upstairs) and more remodeling are added to the back of the house after these photos were taken. 


Today: The house is maintained in its original 1903 turn of the century Victorian elegance.

Visitors who have toured the house know the Museum historians have adequate early records concerning the first families who occupied the residence. Several colorful stories about John G. ("Land") Lund, his sister Mary Lund Hoel and her husband Reverend Olaf Hoel are always interesting! Records for the later years are in the process of research concerning the names of the many renters and boarders who once called this house "home".


Lund, along with his sister Mollie and her husband Frank, planted over 400 trees during the spring months. In 1891, John Lund's "lot" covered more than half a village block, and his sister owned a charming corner house just a block away.


In 1890, Lund planned his "palatial residence". With the charm and style of a circus ringmaster, John G. Lund announced to the editor of the Canby News on the 9th of August that he "was thinking of building a residence" north of the park square.


In the following year, Canbyans were not surprised to see that on April 4th lumber had arrived and was piled on Lund's vacant corner property. The Canby News observed "Mr. Lund will put up a very fine residence from modern plans." Thus, on June 5th, Canby's showman-salesman and youthful near-millionaire was ready to move his new wife into their new house built (with carpenters given Sundays off as days of rest) in less than two months! Today tour guides refer to this first part of the structure as Lund's "49 Day" House.


Although the "49 Day" House was brand new, it received the decorative balconies, the turret, and the "gingerbread" trim nine years later when whopping real estate sales by the Lund Land Agency made John G. famous throughout the state and a bona fide millionaire.


The "landmark" fence of "hardheads" (field stones) appeared in the summer of 1900. The fence was restored and completely rebuilt by Orlando Menk in 1986. The Canby News states, "This stone is odd yet there is a charm about it which tends to make its surroundings home-like and unique."


[As a side note, the Canby News has been in operation for over 145 years and is still the local center for news.]



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(Museum Encompassing Canby Community Area, Inc.)

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Site last modified:  4/20/21  

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